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    Metacognition Power-point

     

    Time Management

    This folder contains articles, websites, ideas and more.  Explore and try different ways of managing your time to see what works for you.  

    Benefits of Time Management Skills

    High school can be very busy. But the adult world can be even busier. So it's important to start teaching your teen how to manage his time now. He'll enjoy immediate benefits such as:

    • Reduced anxiety when projects are due in school or test dates are approaching.
    • Increased responsibility and independence.
    • Better decision-making skills.
    • More time for family and friends.
    • Better performance at work and school.
    • More opportunities to relax and unwind.

    Witmer, Denise. “These Time Management Skills Will Prevent Your Teen from Becoming a Lifelong Procrastinator.” Verywell, About.com, 2 May 2016, www.verywell.com/teaching-time-management-skills-to-teens-2608794.

    The Study Cycle

     

     

    Study Cycle

     

    Step #1 of Study Cycle: Previewing Reading Material

    The goal of reading something is to learn.  You must be ACTIVELY engaged when reading.  So what does that mean?   

    This folder contains some very helpful strategies for reading when note taking.  The Cornell Method is a great one to start with and at its core is PREVIEWING.  It is important you be open to trying more than one to figure out what method works best for you.  

    Step #2 of the Study Cycle- Attend Class

    Simply attending class is not enough, you MUST be ACTIVELY engaged.  Active engagement in class means:

    • listening, not just hearing
    • taking notes, not copying only what is on the board, but paraphrasing from a lecture
    • asking questions, if your preview questions aren't answered... ask them

    Step #3 of the Study Cycle: Review

    Taking notes in class is not enough to truly learn these new concepts and vocabulary.  

    Learning, according to Bloom's Taxonomy, requires us to APPLY, ANALYZE, EVALUATE, and/or CREATE using the new material.  This is where Step #3 and Step #4 will blend together and help you move from REMEMBERING to mastering.  

    The goal of Bloom's Taxonomy isn't to focus on PERFORMANCE, it is to focus on LEARNING.  

    Blooms

    Step #4 of Study Cycle: Intense Study Sessions

    Intense Study Session

    • enable students to break up their work into manageable chunks.

    Sessions can be:

    • 2-3  15 minute chunks of time (good for students that have difficulty focusing for long periods of time)
    • 30-40 minute chunk of time

    The Process:

    • 1 - Set specific goals- use the first few minutes of session to set a manageable number of achievable goals ( 5 minutes)
    • 2 - Do active learning tasks - 20-30 minutes
    • 3 - Take a break/Have a reward- 5 minutes ***Breaks are "crucial for restoring energy and motivation, and for allowing the information you've just absorbed to 'sink in'"***
    • 4 - Review- (metacognitive reflection) - 5 minutes
      • Assess how well you have learned the material you studied. 
      • Determine if you need to tweak your learning strategies and adjust for next time.  

    Example #1:  Reading from Textbook

    • Preview reading material - 5 minutes
    • Take notes (Cornell Method) using headings within reading material - 20-30 minutes
    • Break - 5 minutes
    • Review - Metacognitive Reflection -  5 minutes

    Example #2:  Reviewing Material for a Test

    • Gather all testable material (lecture notes, reading notes, worksheets, labs, old quizzes, review guide, etc) - 5 minutes
    • Prioritize Material according to most - least likely to be tested oraccording to what you least likely understand - most likely understand - 5 minutes
    • Answer questions/study tools from Cornell style notes, complete practice problems (even if you have done them already), complete a mind map, practice flash cards, or use other study tool (see examples in folder) - 20-30 minutes
    • Break - 5 minutes
    • Review - metacognitive reflection - 5 minutes

    Step #4 of the Study Cycle, con.: Top 10 Metacognitive Learning Strategies

    Metacognition: "thinking about your own thinking" - John H. Flavell

    Mecognition gives you the ability to:

    • Think about your own thinking
    • Be consciously aware of oneself as a problem solver
    • Monitor, plan, and control one's mental processing
    • Accurately judge one's level of learning

    This folder contains helpful strategies you can apply within your Intense Study Sessions.  

    Step #4 of the Study Cycle, con.: Graphic Organizers

    Many students find graphic organizers helpful, not just to organize information, but also to process the information they are learning.  This folder contains several different types of organizers.  We will be using these to complete an activity in class.  

     Reading and Notetaking

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      The goal of reading something is to learn.  You must be ACTIVELY engaged when reading.  So what does that mean?   

      This folder contains some very helpful strategies for reading when note taking.  The Cornell Method is a great one to start with.  It is important you be open to trying more than one to figure out what method works best for you.  

    Test Taking Strategies

    This folder contains several documents sharing strategies to use when test taking.  Of course the best strategy to employ when test taking is to have actively studied, but there are some things you can do while taking the test that can be very useful!  Explore the files within this folder and pick a few to try.  

    Maguire Presentation

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